Press Release

BiZBash.com For Immediate Release Contact: David Adler 646.638.3600 Ext: 101
Cell: 917.543.1024
dadler@bizbash.com

Event Professionals Respond to First Annual Big Badge/BiZBash Nametag Survey
Respondents weigh-in on pet peeves, perceptions and best practices

New York, New York - April 16, 2003 - Event professionals have strong opinions on the topic of nametags according to a recent Big Badge/BiZBash Nametag Survey 2003. BiZBash, the media outlet serving the event and meeting industry, conducted a survey during the week of April 1, 2003. More than 900 event professionals responded within 12 hours and more than 200 responded with comments. Big Badge, a global supplier of nametags and badges to the convention industry co-sponsored the survey.

Event Professionals' Biggest Nametag Pet Peeves
The biggest nametag peeves among event planners are as follows. Waiting in long lines to get your tag, misspelled names, small type size, handwritten tags, using stick-on nametags that ruin clothing, inappropriate use of name tags at unsuitable events, and sloppy execution of last minute attendee badges, making them look like second-class citizens.

  • 1 out of 2 event professionals think misspelled names on nametags range from embarrassing to a major problem.
  • 1 out of 2 event professionals feel small type size on a nametag ranges from an annoyance to a major problem.
  • 3 out of 5 event professionals think waiting in long lines to receive nametags range from an annoyance to a major problem for event organizers.
  • 3 out of 5 event professionals feel sloppy execution of last minute attendee badges make them look like second-class citizens.
  • 4 out of 5 event professionals feel nametags are unsuitable at black tie events.
  • 7out of 10 event professionals feel handwritten nametags range from an annoyance to a major problem.
  • 7 out of 10 event professionals feel adhesive stick-on tags range from an annoyance to a major problem if damage to clothing is a risk.
  • 7 out of 10 event professionals feel company names should be present on nametags at business events.

When asked what kind of nametag respondents preferred, clip-on tags with professional logos led. Other results:

Most Preferred Nametags

  1. Clip-on with Professional Logos
  2. Magnetic Fasteners
  3. Lanyards
  4. Pin-On
  5. Stick-On
Typeface of Nametags
When asked about the typeface most desired, event professionals chose big, bold letters over sans serif or skinny typefaces. Once again, handwritten tags were considered the least desirable.

Appropriateness of Nametags
When asked when nametags are appropriate, event planners feel they're appropriate at networking events, political functions and at any function in which buyers need to know sellers with the expressed intention of marketing to each other. They felt strongly that name tags are not appropriate at evening cocktail or black tie events.

Reason for Nametags
Most event professionals felt name tags are great for simple identification, while 3 in 10 planners felt name tags can be an important branding tool for an organization.

Perceived Value
When asked about the cost of a nametag, more than half thought the cost of name tags should be less than $1 each, and less than half thought a name tag should cost between $1 and $2.

What Should Appear on the Nametag
Responses to what should appear on the face of the nametag were varied:

First name only
4%
First name large with full name repeated below and company name the same size
30%
First and last name large with company below and without title
38%
First and last name large with title and company below
28%

Over 200 respondents had comments on the nametag topic, ranging from name tags being a "necessary evil," to important protocol advice and design suggestions.

B.I.G is a global leader, providing brand enhancing badges, identification systems and print personalization solutions. B.I.G commenced trading in 1988. Since 1988, the company has supplied more than 25 million badges to clients who demand not only innovative products and a high level of service, but also solutions that are quick, economical and easy to use. Currently BIG Badge achieves $9 million in sales annually.

BiZBash Media publishes the BiZBash Event Style Reporter newspaper and the BiZBash Event Style Alert email newsletter, and hosts the annual BiZBash Javits Meeting and Event Expo-The Fresh Idea Show. The company was founded on the premise that the regional meeting, event and trade show market is underserved. Prior to September 11, 2001, New York hosted more than 100,000 business events and meetings each year, representing a $4 billion marketplace.





- 30 -