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EVENT REPORT

Us Weekly Takes to Voyeur With Scantily Clad Models, Burlesque Feel

Us Weekly's "Hot Hollywood" party at Voyeur

Photo: Line 8 Photography

On Wednesday, Us Weekly toasted its annual Hot Hollywood issue with a celebrity-filled event at West Hollywood's new Voyeur. After a stint in New York, the party came back to Los Angeles this year, and its latest incarnation stuck to its known formula: introducing guests to a mostly yet-unseen, buzzed-about new nightclub. This time, the dark, broody Voyeur set the stage for the program.

The mag's honorees in attendance included “Comeback of the Year” Kristen Cavallari, “Victor of the Year” Kris Allen, and “Glam God of the Year” Adam Lambert, and the cast of Glee, which Us named “Cast of the Year.” Wenner Media's Keira Ford oversaw the event, tapping Caravents to produce it once again.

Dancers styled a la Eyes Wide Shut performed throughout the space, and leather curtains and velvet furnishings gave the party a burlesque feel. Caravents used decor in burgundy and crimson to inspire an autumnal mood—not to mention a bit of Hollywood drama—and a golden carpet sprawled beneath a 32-foot step-and-repeat. After celebrities walked the arrivals line, they headed down the carpet into a crimson-draped photo studio to have their mugs snapped for use in the following week’s Hot Hollywood issue.

Next, they proceeded into the gifting suite, where True Religion hawked its wares and Vaseline showcased its new lotion line, Sheer Infusions; the brand also offered mini hand massages inside the party. Sponsor Skyy poured its cocktails, and drinks from sponsors Miller Genuine Draft and Snapple were also available at the bars. To integrate sponsor Yahoo, Caravents set up a logo photo booth inside the venue that allowed guests to email shots to their friends and phones, right from the party.
 
DJ Rashida spun for guests like Adam Lambert, Leona Lewis, and Whitney Port (who organizers worked to keep away from Stephanie Pratt—as such details are important in Hollywood). Overhead, a mesh canopy supported a writhing, scantily clad live model.


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