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A Splashy Way to Get Event Guests to Take Photos

One Campaign debuted a projection of photos that constantly updated at its philanthropy event at the Hudson Hotel.

One Campaign worked with the Hudson Hotel team and digital content agency Dawn of Man to launch the #Strengthie art installation on the front of the hotel, which constantly changed with photos of people striking the Rosie the Riveter pose.
One Campaign worked with the Hudson Hotel team and digital content agency Dawn of Man to launch the #Strengthie art installation on the front of the hotel, which constantly changed with photos of people striking the Rosie the Riveter pose.
Photo: Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for One Campaign

While guests posting photos of themselves at an event on social media has become the norm, event photo sharing reached new heights when attendees at a recent event in New York were able to see their photos projected almost instantly on the front of a hotel.

To draw attention to its "Poverty Is Sexist" campaign, international campaigning and advocacy organization One Campaign showcased an interactive art installation that involved projecting a series of constantly updating photos—many of which were taken in real time—on the façade of the Hudson Hotel.

The projection, which debuted at the organization's philanthropic event on September 27, was a physical activation of what started as a social media campaign earlier this year. The campaign aimed to show support for women around the world by featuring people striking a Rosie the Riveter pose, which was dubbed a #Strengthie.

Andrew Marshall, senior director of global digital content at One Campaign, said the organization wanted to bring the campaign to New York in a physical way. The organization partnered with digital content agency Dawn of Man and the Hudson Hotel team to launch the projection.

"We gathered images that people had posted on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and compiled them into a video with additional motion graphics," said Marshall. "That was projected from the roof of a truck in downtown Manhattan onto the front of the Hudson Hotel, after dark."

Guests inside the Hudson Bar event space were able to use the rotating design themes, city street views, and exposed brick walls as backdrops for their #Strengthie photos.

"It was a way of taking an online, digital piece of activism by thousands of activists around the world and making it concrete—making it real in the physical world," said Marshall. "That's important when you're arguing for change. And it got noticed."